Are You Okay With a Slightly Older Girlfriend? Volume 1 | Light Novel Review

Title: Are You Okay With a Slightly Older Girlfriend? Vol 1
Author: Kota Nozomi
Illustrator: Nanasemeruchi
Translator: Sean Orth
Publisher: J-Novel Club
ASIN: B08PKPCMG2
Copyright © 2018 by Kota Nozomi

This is one of of those times when a light novel is the perfect pick for the SJWs to cancel and convince themselves they’ve done something for society. There’s no anime adaptation, so it’s going to take a while before that happens.

First-year high school student Momota Kaoru just saved a beautiful high school girl, Orihara Hime, from a train molester. One thing leads to another, and they end up going on a date! They have a lot in common: they both love video games, they both jam to their favorite songs on mixtapes, they were even both born in the Year of the Snake. Except… Orihara’s first game console used cartridges… and her old mixtapes are all on MiniDisc… and, oh, her birthday is actually 12 years before Momota’s! When her secret comes out, she thinks it must all be over… but will Momota really let something like a little age gap get in the way of his love for Orihara? Find out if love really can transcend generations in this sugar-sweet romantic comedy!

The novel could be disturbing or it could be a beautiful story based on that description. I must say it’s neither.

The story is something you would expect from an anime of the romance genre with a bit of fanservice. It does its best to be cute, but at the same time, it breaks some of these adorable moments with teenage talk.

I’m going to give you an example of it. At the beginning of the light novel, our protagonist, a high school student called Momota Kaoru, is on his way to school on a train. He sees Orihara Hime, the other protagonist, and starts describing her beauty, her clothing, her hair, and then:

“And… so BIG. There they sat, underneath her blazer, pushing up her thinly knit sweater: two rolling hills with the ability to drive a man insane with one look. So abundant… hanging so heavy… the kind of terrifyingly beautiful breasts whose very existence feels like a crime, breasts that make you want to sue someone.”

Momota Kaoru

Through the story, you’ll find interruptions like that. I know that as an anime fan I should’ve gotten used to it, but some variety wouldn’t hurt readers, in my opinion. Kudos to the protagonist and the funny way to deal with the train molester. I won’t complain about some good humor.

After the things I said above, I must say that it does make sense. Momota is a teenage boy, and most teenagers have their hormones acting crazy. It’s expected to see our protagonist having an extra pick at a woman’s curves. However, in the relationship (it’s not a spoiler, from the title you know they’ll start a romantic relationship), Momota shows himself very shy; he gives Hime space and never tries to do anything weird to Hime. He always does his best to make her feel comfortable all the time and even finds the right words to make her smile. He acts his age and a bit mature at the same time.

Hime is where the problems begin. She’s a 27-year-old woman with a good job and a position as chief, although she mentioned that her position sounds more impressive than it really is. We get to know her more later in the book; some chapters focus on her first-person perspective. It is a good detail to see pages from her eyes and thoughts. But this left me a lot of questions—one of them asking who’s the real adult in the story: Momota, a 15-year-old student, or Hime, the 27-year-old worker. This is the first time, even in fiction, that I see an adult worrying so bad about a teenager and his feelings; and the feelings she started to have for him.

We see a really dumb explanation for it, and a dumbest reason why she was wearing a school uniform in the first place. I’m not kidding, I tried to imagine the situation they described, and I still don’t see anything that makes any sense.

If you think that the “age/maturity” of the adult protagonist is my only issue, you’re wrong. Their friends are the exact kind of weird people whose the more years they’ve lived, the more immature they talk. Momota’s friends are the high school students you would expect; they act their age and do their age. I have no problem with them. Hime’s friend, though, is another story; first, she is the reason why Hime was wearing a school uniform, and second, she spoke like an adult when we met her and warned Hime about the legal consequences that relationship might bring. Pages later, she seems so okay with that romantic relationship that she almost seemed like the person trying to make them go a little further.

To be fair, the light novel is not bad. I don’t consider it offensive or a cringe-fest. I am not sure, though, if the author just tried to make an excuse to make a student’s proportions that big telling she’s a 27-year-old worker. Hime acts so childishly that I can’t have any other impression of it, but I don’t know the author, and I prefer to give the benefit of the doubt. I guess if you like fan service with a few cute moments, this could be your cup of tea, but I bet there are many better options out there.

If you’re still interested in reading the light novel, here’s the official website – https://j-novel.club/series/are-you-okay-with-a-slightly-older-girlfriend

Thank you for reading my review.

Boogiepop, a Motivation to Learn Japanese

What is your motivation to learn a new language? Music? Literature? Movies? Or perhaps an additional skill for your resume? I guess we all have different reasons for learning a new language; all of them valid and all of them can help you understand a little bit more about a culture. I’ve mentioned before that I learned English for the music and literature.

English is the easiest language to learn, and it also gives you access to a lot of information and entertainment. It’s the language the majority knows and must learn as a second language (unless it’s your native tongue) to get a better chance to find a job these days.

Boogiepop light novels, Volumes 1, 2, and 3

I was not expecting to be learning Japanese anytime soon. Some of you already know I like anime, but not at the point where I would be going crazy with a Pikachu costume. The subtitles are comfortable to me; someone has to be really dumb to believe another language is destroying, let’s say, America. Wink

Remember this tweet about the movie called Parasite and the Oscars?

A man named Bong Joon Ho wins #Oscar for best original screenplay over Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and 1917.

Acceptance speech was: “GREAT HONOR. THANK YOU.”

Then he proceeds to give the rest of his speech in Korean.

These people are the destruction of America.

— Jon Miller (@MillerStream) February 10, 2020

Yeah, I apologize; I just needed an excuse to point out stupidity, even though it is not even the point of my entry. Hey, these are the advantages of a freelancer like me, and then I wonder why I don’t have many followers. It is what it is, I guess. Ah, yes, and the tweet is not available anymore, I wonder why? Ah, yes, I am being sarcastic. I bet you remember it, and I don’t really want to forget we have this kind of people with influence.

I am going back to the subject, alright? I was saying I like watching my shows with subtitles, these are just at the bottom of the screen, and I can read lines instantly in English and Spanish. I felt okay with that. Besides, I’ve never been a hardcore fan of a show to wait for something more if not available. If the anime or movie is not on a LEGAL streaming platform like Crunchyroll or Funimation, I don’t watch it, as simple as that. Then I watched an anime called Boogiepop and Others, its first episode was so confusing, but it grabbed my attention until I fell in love with it. It was the first time that I felt the necessity to get the original source. I thought it would be a manga, but I ended up discovering something called a light novel.

I do have a post about light novels, so please check it out if you have not already.

Boogiepop is also known as the granfather of light novels. This means it is one of the series, if not the first, that introduced what we know as a light novel today; it amazes me that Boogiepop never received enough attention. The 2019 anime adaptation was not popular either. I understand, however, its lack of success; the story can be confusing. The novel/anime constantly jumps from one character to another and from one time to another. It is not a linear story, and you need to put the pieces together. The anime adaptation does not even tell you where it is, and you get prequel episodes without notice. The light novel at least gives you a clear hint that you’re reading from another character’s perspective.

It is a shame that these novels are not going to be popular in our continent ever. It’ll need more than another anime season or reboot to get the attention it deserves. I am not even crossing my fingers because I know that train has been long gone. There are comments that even Boogiepop’s fanbase is moving onto different fandoms as we speak, but these are only speculations. If this is the case, though, I would not be surprised either. The industry in constantly moving on, never waiting for us to catch up with it. A company is always about business and money before pleasing ALL customers. They try to please a majority. And because I love something with all my heart and soul, I know that I don’t represent the majority.

After everything I said and the title of this post, I think you already know what’s the remaining option if I want to read Boogiepop.

Learning Japanese From Scratch

Learning another language to watch your favorite TV shows is as valid as learning it for your resume. In the end, even if it was entertainment the reason you’ve learned a language, the skill is going to be there, and it can be used in your professional life. Just please, do not tell the interviewer you learned a language to watch [insert any show from any country] without subtitles.

There is a huge difference between a language that uses the same writing as your own and a language that uses different writing. My mother tongue is Spanish, and my secondary is English. Even though these languages are different, both use Roman/Latin alphabet; there are tiny differences between pronunciation in both languages, but in general, you just need to adjust to the other to learn, right? Imagine growing up with only one alphabet and then trying to jump to a language with different letters, like Russian, Japanese, Chinese, you name it. It is a world (or a continent) of difference.

With the internet, anime, cosplay, and otakus in general, Japanese exposition has grown in our continent, giving a lot of relevance to the culture, which has been an important milestone for diversity. We have many things to choose from, and from different countries; we are not forced to watch or listen to local or American media anymore. We have access to bits of many countries from the commodity of our homes. Unfortunately, there are so many other things out there that never get an official translation or release near us. No, I DO NOT support piracy!

Boogiepop Missing: Peppermint Wizard

Boogiepop Missing: Peppermint Wizard is the 7th volume of the series, but it is also from here that the light novels haven’t gotten an official translation. The last book we got officially translated was Boogiepop at Dawn, a prequel to the series. I want to believe that at least it was a good place to stop, except that I fell in love with Boogiepop. I know many people are waiting for Seven Seas Entertainment to release more official translations, and I know that will not happen ever, so there is only one way to read the following novels. What a weird place to start, right?

I might update my progress if I feel like it.

To conclude this post, I need to tell you I feel excited. The perfect opportunity AND motivation reached me. You should check the light novels if you haven’t already. There’s also an anime adaptation of the novels 1-3, 5, and 6, available on Crunchyroll, but you need to go with an open mind.

Have you heard about Boogiepop? Have you learned another language for entertainment purposes?

Do You Love Your Mom and Her Two-Hit Multi-Target Attacks? Volume 1 | A Light Novel Review

Title: Do You Love You Mom and Her Two-Hit Mullti-Target Attacks?
Volume 1
Author: Dachima Inaka
Publisher: Yen On
ISBN: 978-1-9753-2800-9
ASIN: B07D2B5ZWD

Let’s have a quick look first. The light novel got an anime adaptation in 2019. The reception was mixed, from regular to terrible, but not for the story or characters; many people mentioned an Oedipus Complex. When we talk about anime, you know it’s easy to expect a lot of weird stuff. At the same time, though, people on the internet are getting offended by everything; apparently, any letter from the alphabet is an insult, so I can’t take any of their opinions seriously.

I am here to have a look at the light novel.

For some reason, the government in Japan is concerned about teenagers and their relationship with their mothers. That’s why they asked schools around the country to give students a survey. Masato, the protagonist, filled everything and wondered about the last question: If you went on an adventure with your mom, would you become closer?

This is the beginning of a story. After that, our second (or perhaps main) protagonist, Mamako; Masato’s doting mother. She is described as a housewife who could easily pass for a teenage girl, a transcendent being.

Masato feels very annoyed by his mom; she cares too much about him that he’s tired. I’m not going to lie; the boy is kind of a dick to her at the beginning. Although I believe a lot of people might remember being annoyed by their parents.

There’s a character named Shirase, whose name means inform in English; I learned it because every single time she speaks is to tell us she’s there to inform. A joke she kills immediately. Shirase is the person that distributes an MMORPG videogame… oh no, wait, I meant MMMMMORPG (Mom’s Massively Maternal Multiplayer Making-up-with-Offspring Role-Playing Game.) Yeah, that is what the genre is called.

This light novel is of the isekai genre, so it’s unnecessary to explain that Shirase, using Masato’s computer, transports both mother and son into the game. At first, Masato was happy because he would be the protagonist and perhaps the hero of a fantasy videogame until he noticed his mother, Mamako, was there too.

It all starts like any other fantasy game. They start with assigned stats and quests. The first quest is to choose the sword they’re going to carry along the journey. For some reason, Mamako was able to retrieve two swords. By this point, we know that the game is a beta version; thus, the characters believe that’s why the mother was able to do that. The overpowered trope is with most isekais, so there’s nothing strange here.

Mamako pulled out the lava and deep-sea swords as well. The legendary swords that only chosen could use, and she’d just picked two of them up.

However, it is predictable that the game is about mothers, so I don’t need to tell Mamako IS overpowered. And the series points out a lot that she doesn’t even know how to play a game, so everything she does is unintentional except when protecting Masato.

As with any MMORPG… right, MMMMMORPG, I’m sorry. The protagonists need a party to help them in the adventure. They recruit two characters; Porta, the loli of the group that works as the party’s support member; and Wise, the tsundere that functions as the mage. And that’s it. That’s all you get from these two characters, a loli and a tsundere; they are the definition of both stereotypes, and there’s nothing else.

I know that most anime characters follow these tropes, but here is what they are. There’s no trace of personality that could make them likable. Porta is adorable, yes, but she’s just a little thing in the background picking up loot.

I have to say that the protagonists are the stars. Masato is another trope, but his relationship with his mother makes him a unique character in a good way (and weird), and he grows throughout the story. Mamako is adorable, and she’s the reason the story has some progress; she even makes Porta and Wise look a little bit like something.

The world does not seem attractive, but I’m not going to blame the author or so. I believe we don’t see much of this world because it is the first volume of a light novel (light is the keyword here.) However, there are not many signals that there’ll be something to pick the reader’s interest. This situation is the same case as Porta and Wise. The story is set in a fantasy game, and that’s it—a generic fantasy world.

I must admit, though, that the reading is enjoyable. It is actually well enough to make you enjoy what is happening, and some of its imagery is very good despite any idea anyone may have of a light novel. Overall, I recommend it to any hardcore isekai fan. The characters and world are, as I mentioned, a pure representation of the usual stereotypes, but the mother is something that no one has ever done before, so kudos for that little addition.

For me, this first volume of Do You Love Your Mom and Her Two-Hit Multi-Target Attacks? was not interesting enough to get the next number. I got tired of the isekai formula, and I believe there are better light novel series of the genre.

I could keep going if you ask me to. Other than that, this is my last review of the series.

There’s one important question now:

Is this light novel as creepy or disturbing as some people say?

No, I believe people are exaggerating a little. The light novel, however, is a mixed bag. I can understand that some of the situations that happen are very weird; we’re talking about mother and son here; it wouldn’t have anything strange if the things I talk about happened to the other party members.

The majority of Masato’s comments said that it’s weird to have a mother that looks his own age and others that she’s cute for her age.

Geez, she’s cute. No, no, no, wait, wait! That’s my mom! She’s, like, forty! Well outside the acceptable range of “cute”! Not the point anyway!

There is one part that went a little bit far. It did last a few lines, but that one part, I understand some readers got uncomfortable. The party was fighting a giant slime, and Mamako’s clothes dissolved after an attack. Her son tried to protect her, but he fell on her, and both of their bodies were slippery. And it didn’t help that Mamako herself said something like this:

“N-n-n-no, Ma-kun! We’re parent and child! I know you love me, but how could you push me to the ground and dissolve my clothes like this?! At least…at least turn off the light!” She continued to shine brilliantly.”

It was uncomfortable to read all of a sudden. As I said, the light novel is not like this all the time. I admit it surprised me. However, the rest of the light novel is your normal isekai full of the purest form of stereotypes. The ecchi tones are not even present, just in a few lines, but it is not nearly as disturbing as the internet is making it look.

Feel free to share your thought if you’d like. Do you agree? Do you disagree? Feel free to let me know in the comments.

Light Novels

I’m a person who enjoys anime. Most anime series are easy and fun to watch. It has a lot of genres for all types of individuals. I enjoy all of them; if I feel like a high-action and funny anime shows, I watch a shonen anime (One Piece, Jujutsu Kaisen, just to name two). If I want to watch some comedies, Asobi Asobase and Konosuba are my favorites.

Suppose I want to watch something more serious; romantic, paranormal, sci-fi, or other genres that take themselves more seriously. In that case, there are so many recommendations I’d probably make in the future.

As some of you already know, most of the anime shows came from Japanese comics, better known as mangas, with a few exceptions. Some people like to collect merchandise, and that includes the sources from their favorite shows. One of my friends is a hardcore One Piece fan; he watches the show on Crunchyroll and collects the mangas.

I’m not much of a collector, but there are a few shows that I loved so much I got tempted to acquire the mangas. Boogiepop and Others, Re:Zero – Starting Life in Another World, and Konosuba: God’s Blessing on This Wonderful World! are just a few shows that I loved so much no I want to collect the original material. I was surprised, though, when I realized these shows didn’t come from a manga. These shows came from something called light novels. It was the first time I heard of such things as light novels.

As an avid reader, the term got me intrigued. At first, I thought a light novel would be pages full of dialogs with one illustration to complement it; you know, left page the image, right page the dialogues, something like that. I was wrong.

What is a light novel then?

A light novel is a style of Japanese light novels for young adults, although there are some series for adults. Most of these novels have an average length of about 50,000 words, which is the minimum word count for a traditional book to be considered a novel.

Bookstore in Macau (photo I took from Wikipedia)

Many light novels, like their manga older brother, is serialized. There is more than one volume of each series. I like to think of light novels as books for anime/manga fans. This format is becoming very popular, with publishers like Yen On and J-Novel translating them into this language; I believe some English original light novels exist. Perhaps it’s a format that’ll become something more in the west. For now, it’s a niche that will get some strength; time will tell.

Another similarity with mangas is that some of them get compiled as omnibuses, two or more volumes in one book. The first light novels that I bought were the Boogiepop series, which unfortunately didn’t get translated past volume 6.

Today you can buy the English version of the Boogiepop light novels, whether you’d like to buy the six individual volumes or two omnibuses like I did (image above). Just saying!

How is the content like?

Light novel is an accurate term to describe these books. They are easy to read, follow, and finish. There are no heavy descriptions as you usually see in traditional novels. There is a general description of the world and the characters; the reason is that you’ll find a few illustrations in the books. These are basically manga-like drawings of the characters and a situation so that you won’t get lost.

All of this work very well to complete what a light novel is. On one side, you have some descriptions, first-person or third-person point of view, depending on the story; and on the other side, you know how the characters look because you have an illustration.

One thing does NOT replace the other

I am sure new folks looking at this format may wonder if these light novels would replace traditional books one day. Short answer: no.

If you’re new and feel curious about them, you might think that the light novels are like YA (young adult) books that are very popular in any bookstore. Sure, but you need to divide the soul of your favorite book into two: its narrative and illustrations. One is not going to work without the other, even if you add more images. Needs to be a balance between the two to make a light novel.

Also, it is important to mention that this format is clearly written for manga and anime fans. Of course, this does not mean that someone else should not read it; quite the contrary. I believe this is an excellent opportunity for two kinds of hobbyists to approach the other. The anime and manga fans look at literature, and the literature fans look at the anime and manga. For me, this is another good way to break stereotypes, open our minds to other media, and realize there are many exciting works created in different formats for all tastes.

Give light novels an opportunity. I’m sure you’re going to find something interesting.

I Read Boogiepop

This was originally intended to be a review. However, the anime is so faithful to its original presentation, a light novel, that I believe it would be unnecessary. In case you want to know what I think of Boogiepop, go and check my review of the anime. Or, if you want to check it out for yourself, the anime is available on Crunchyroll.


My journey through Boogiepop started with the anime, Boogiepop and Others, based on the first episode, I couldn’t find any sense on what was happening in the show. I have a rule, though, which says that I should try two to three episodes before abandoning. I did, I watched the three episodes, and had the same feeling. But it was different: I never thought it was bad, I knew that show wasn’t telling the story chronologically, and the plot had an eerie vibe. My mind was deciding if I should overthink things through, or just look other way. Of course, whatever makes my head hurt is always the choice I end up making. OVERTHINK!!!!!!!!

The anime is confusing, it never tells you when the point of view has changed. It never tells you dates, or even if the arc is finished or not. The first episode is something before AND after the conflict of the first arc has ended, the events of the following episodes (just the first arc, to be clear) happen somewhere in-between the episode one. Yeah, I know it’s confusing when you hear about it or if you decide to watch without any clue of the series. It took me a while to realize that.

The light novel, although it isn’t clear when the events take place, at least it tells you that we’re looking at the arc from a different perspective; it makes things easier for the reader to put the pieces together. Sure, it doesn’t make it less complicated, but at least is not a bunch of apparent random things happening. In retrospective, the best option to approach Boogiepop, definitely is the light novel. I cannot deny that things could have been told a little more… chronologically, but I don’t know if the light novel would have gotten the same reception. Maybe it’s just to over complicate the story, or perhaps add a certain mystery to its pages?

I love Boogiepop, and I will DEFINITELY recommend it if you’re looking for an interesting urban fantasy setting. Unfortunately, this is not a story for everyone; it could be boring at times, as I mentioned, it doesn’t tell you much, and that might not sound very attractive, or even entertaining at all. Approach it with caution.

Just a few words

I read the first omnibus, which includes the first, second, and third light novels. These three novels cover the Manticore and Imaginator arcs. Both arcs are good; the mystery around them are interesting.

It is sad that only the first six novels (or two omnibuses) had been translated to English. I am not sure if they have any plans to translate the other light novels, or at least animate more seasons, but at the very least I can talk a little about the series and see if my little voice is heard.


Have you read or watched Boogiepop? Let me know!